Metal Free Crowns By:- Dr. Aroras Dental Square

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    A crown is a restoration that covers, or “caps,” a tooth to restore it to its normal shape and size, strengthening and improving the appearance of a tooth. Prosthetic crowns are made of metal, porcelain fused to metal substrates, or new all-white restorative materials. Crowns are necessary when a tooth is generally broken down and fillings won’t solve the problem. If a tooth is cracked, a crown holds the tooth together to seal the cracks so the damage doesn’t get worse. Crowns are also used to support a large filling when there isn’t enough of the tooth remaining, attach a bridge, protect weak teeth from fracturing, restore fractured teeth, cover badly shaped or discolored teeth or protect a root-canal filled tooth with compromised strength. All-porcelain (ceramic) crowns without metal core are distinguished by their excellent aesthetics. Light is not only reflected, there is also real transparency as seen in natural teeth. This effect makes the all-porcelain crown perfect for use in anterior areas, whereby minor form and alignment corrections are also possible. A further advantage of the metal-free ceramic crown is the tooth-shaded margin, which need not be placed under the gum line. Thus, the crown margin does not irritate the gingival tissue and prevents gum recession. There are various types of material used for all-porcelain or all-ceramic crowns: Empress, Procera, Lava, Zirconia, Cerecon, Inceram etc. are all various types of metal free ceramic crowns and there is difference in the materials used. Several factors are considered in the selection of the crown material: strength requirements, esthetic requirements, the abrasivity of the material against the opposing teeth. How is a crown placed? The tooth is numbed and prepared for the crown by removing any decay or weakened areas. The remaining tooth structure is then reshaped to meet proper crown preparation design. If necessary, a restorative material, usually a composite resin, is added to the remaining tooth structure to ensure that the prosthetic crown will have a good foundation. This procedure is called a “build-up.” After the tooth is prepared, an impression of teeth and gums is made and sent to the lab for the crown fabrication. On the next visit, we cement the permanent crown onto the tooth. During the second appointment, the new crown is placed on the tooth. Adjustments may be required to exact the perfect fit, so that the crown will feel comfortable in the mouth and will conform to the bite. When the crown fits seamlessly and contacts the neighboring teeth correctly, the crown is cemented on the tooth.